Chrysaora hysoscella

Chrysaora hysoscella
Compass jellyfish

Stinging

Description

It is a high stinging species with important effects on humans. It is recommended to avoid all contact with this jellyfish.

The sting produced by Chrysaora hysoscella generally produces a severe pain with burning and itching in the first 20 minutes after the contact that usually disappears in the first two hours. Erythema and edema may also appear after 48 hours of contact. More severe symptoms have been reported in very few cases.

In case you have been stung by this species:
DO NOT APPLY FRESHWATER, NO VINEGAR, NO PRESSURE BANDAGE, NO ALCOHOL. Seek immediate medical attention if shock or breathing difficulties occur.

1) CAREFULLY WASH WITH SEAWATER, DO NOT RUB.
2) IF AVAILABLE, APPLY A BAKING SODA SLURRY (50% commercial baking soda; 50% seawater) FOR FIVE MINUTES to prevent further envenomation from attached tentacles.
3) USE A PLASTIC CARD TO REMOVE RESIDUALS OF TENTACLES.
4) APPLY ICE PACKS (wrapped in a cloth or thin towel, not directly on the skin) for 5-15 minutes - Warn victim that ice pack may be uncomfortable at first!
5) REASSESS PAIN AND REAPPLY ICE PACKS IF NECESSARY.
6) IF PAIN PERSISTS, CONSULT YOUR PHARMACIST OR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – Ask for analgesic + hydrocortisone preparations (eg. lidocaine 3-4% + hydrocortisone).

Characteristics

The umbrela presents a semi-spherical and flattened form, whose diameter can reach up to 30 cm. It has a white-yellow coloration with 16 brown V-shaped bands, ranging from the center to the edge of the umbrela. It presents four oral arms that can measure up to one meter in length, while on the edge of the umbrela emerge 24 long and fine tentacles.

Frequency

Although it can be very abundant in some areas of the Spanish Mediterranean coast, on the Catalan coast is considered a species of low frequency. Adults are observed more frequently during the spring.

Distribution and Habitat

Its distribution includes the Atlantic Ocean and North Sea in zones such as the fjords of Norway, where it can reach enormous densities. In some areas of the Mediterranean Sea, swarms may be common, but on the Catalan coast in recent years there have been very few sightings.